DIY Prosthetic Cover

Prosthesis can leave a lot to be desired, especially when worn under clothing where the silhouette is changed due to the void of space. This can be specially noticeable when walking or when wind is pushing against fabric.
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One of the folks at our receiving warehouse has a leg prosthesis and mentioned the cost of a ‘shell’ cover was prohibitively expensive. When she asked if we thought a Worbla cover could be made for her, we decided to give it a try!

This was our first ever attempt and had to be done in very short sessions, so don’t think this is the only method – this is just a base idea you can expand upon!

Step One: Making a tape duplicate of the body part.
We wrapped our model’s other leg in cellophane and then masking tape to get the basic shape we’d need, then transferred that to Worbla’s Mesh Art. We chose Mesh Art because it’s the most durable of Worbla products.
Note: Obviously this would give us two left calves, but the difference under clothing was not particularly noticeable.

Step Two: Shaping
We cut out our Worbla and heated it over a piece of parchment paper (to keep it from sticking to our table). When it was fully heated and soft, we let it cool enough that it wasn’t too hot to touch, and then wrapped it around our model’s leg. It’s important to be careful of the heat! You can wear an old sock over the skin to keep it insulated if you are very sensitive to heat. Mesh art is very sticky and can leave residue, so don’t use anything you don’t want to risk getting damaged as a buffer layer.

Once we had the piece shaped, we trimmed it down and folded over the edges at the top for additional strength.

Our model's prosthetic, the tape double of her other leg for the pattern, and the formed worbla wrapped around the bare prosthetic - clearly too small, but a good start!
Our model’s prosthetic, the tape double of her other leg for the pattern, and the formed worbla wrapped around the bare prosthetic – clearly too small, but a good start!

Step Three: Padding
We needed something to bulk up the prosthetic leg, and went for as simple and easy as we could: 1/2 inch floor mat foam, cut into 4 strips. We hot glued 2 together (I actually suggest contact cement for a better bond) and added elastic and hook and eye tape for strapping. This allows our model to add the shell when she wants to without permanently modifying her prosthesis.

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Step Four: Attachments
Again, as simple as we could go: Hook and loop tape on elastic. We added this by using hot glue to attach the elastic and then layering a piece of Mesh Art over that, the smooth (glue) side down. This created a very strong bond where we didn’t have to worry about the elastic pulling away with use.

The shell of the leg and the velcro and elastic attachment. You can see the top edge of the Worbla was folded down for a smoother finish and added strength.
The shell of the leg and the hook and loop tape with elastic attachment. You can see the top edge of the Worbla was folded down for a smoother finish and added strength.
For a super strong bond, we wrapped the flastic in Mesh Art first, then attached that to the shell. The adhesive in Mesh Art is so strong we didn't have to worry about the elastic pulling out with use.
For a super strong bond, we wrapped the flastic in Mesh Art first, then attached that to the shell. The adhesive in Mesh Art is so strong we didn’t have to worry about the elastic pulling out with use.

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The finished product isn’t perfect but it does the job of filling up our model’s empty space around her leg and was done with a medium sheet of Mesh Art. It’s lightweight and the cost including elastic and hook loop tape was under $50. And of course you can paint it with spray paint, acrylics, or cover it with fabric to add your own flair!

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TranspArt Examples

When standard Acrylic isn’t viable, Worbla’s TranspArt (WTA) is a clear thermoplastic that offers amazing flexibility and resilience that is solvent-stable, as well as Non-Toxic and Skin-Safe. TranspArt can be vacuformed, both on an actual machine/table as well as by hand with simple tools, can be tinted and dyed, and is incredibly difficult to tear, dent or rip. Look below to see examples of what our customers have done with our product.

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Ice Queen Original Design by Alix Cosplay. TranspArt ice details on the crown, collar, scepter, and shoes.
Photos by Martin Wong, Sometimes I Cosplay Photography, and Obscura Vista

Stella Chuu (also on Instagram) used TranspArt for her Saikizo Frozen Witch headpiece. With photos from Anna Fischer photography, Kaze Photography, and Jwai design

These amazing Coffee Splash and Milk Pour props are frozen in time and made from Worbla’s Transpa Art and Worbla’s Deco Art. Finished with Heritage glass stain and acrylic varnish. Created by Rochelle Redgard with Lida Marx from The Worx Distribution.

Abraham Levy created these amazing TranspArt water pieces, inspired by designer Iris Van Herpen. Videos can be seen here, here, and here. The yellow dress was created for Shea Couleé and used in her Crème Brûlée video seen here (explicit), the pink dress was photographed by thedragphotographer and featured on Drag Race All Stars 4 seen here.

Kuchiki Rukia Bankai Version by LadyShuCosplay, photos by Harui.

Zeratul’s Blade by Nightshift Cosplay

This amazing crystal sabretooth skull was created by Naruvien Art&Design using Worbla’s TranspArt and Worbla’s Finest art, and has a red and green led for interior lighting!

Here’s a video of the lights in action!

Erza Cosplay used Transpart and Worbla’s Finest Art for her Heavy Luminescence Armor and Sword from Guild Wars 2.

TranspArt rose by Calypsen Cosplay

TranspArt Phoenix Headpiece by Gothichamlet of Cowbuttcrunchies.

Celestial Staff by Whimsy-Mimsy, dyed with iDye Poly

TranspArt Visor with Worbla Helmet, and Demon Horns by Melting Props, Cosplay and Projects

These ice crowns were made by Lightning Cosplay

LED Butterfly Wings by Whimsy-Mimsy Cosplay.

TranspArt Bluebird headpiece by Atelier Licorice.

Javakat Cosplay created these glowing apples from Once Upon A Time with TranspArt.

Omni Blade from Mass Effect by Vmachina.

Dungeons and Dragons Rose Cross by Careko

Dragoon Meru from Legend of Dragoon bySpyrah. Wings made from TranspArt, armor made from Worbla’s Finest.

TranspArt flowers and leaves pressed into sillicone moulds, by Worbla Latinoamerica

Worbla’s Finest art bracers covered in TranspArt for an ‘encased in ice’ appearance by Naruvien Art&Design

Sue Storm figure made of clay and then gently vacuformed with TranspArt. Plugsuit made with Finest Art, by the team at Cast4Art. Note the TranspArt even picked up the detail on the bra!

Aurora from Child of Light Crown and Wings made by Maija Cosplay, photos by Patrick Rotthier.

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Mermaid tail by MeltingMirror for her Ursula costume, photo by Martin Wong.

Feathers for Natsu from Soul Calibur V by Dessi-Desu Cosplay, last image by Sweet Sensations Photography

Furiosa Arm and Belt by Jack Gabriel Cosplay made with Worbla’s Finest and foam.

Danerys necklace from Game of Thrones and assorted Elven Accessories by Gladzy Kei Art and Cosplay

Bottle and belt pouches by Lanthea Cosplay

“Harp” made of Worbla by MeltingMirror for her AION Bard cosplay.

Worbla chain by Lanthea Cosplay

Loki’s horned helmet and gold medallions by Naraku Brock

Mechanical arm for Gage the Mechromancer from Borderlands 2 by Kirakira cosplay

Feathered shoulder pauldron by Bambi Cosplay

Pandora Dolls used Worbla for this intricate and elaborate headdress.